by Daniela Pastrana


By 5:00 AM, dozens of women are already lined up outside of this clinic in the Mexican capital. Most come with their mothers, sisters, husbands, friends or boyfriends. A few show up alone.

Sitting on the sidewalk, the women and the people accompanying them try to catch a few winks, in spite of the cold, before dawn breaks and numbers are handed out to the lucky ones. Only the first 30 will be seen today. The rest will have to come back another day.

There are 15 public hospitals in the federal district of the capital that offer safe, legal abortions, but the Beatriz Velasco Reproductive Health Clinic has carried out one-quarter of such procedures since first trimester abortion was legalised by the Mexico City legislature in April 2007.

“The men are great at bringing them here, but not at taking responsibility for supporting their children,” a mother accompanying her young daughter before dawn remarks to IPS.

Standing behind her in the queue, an office worker says this is the third time she’s tried to get a turn, and that no one in her family or at her job knows she’s pregnant.


“No matter what they say, there’s still a lot of prejudice, and they do stigmatise you,” says the young woman.

“We already have two kids, and this year we both lost our jobs, so I just don’t see any other option,” another woman, whose husband’s arm is around her shoulders, says brusquely.


In the last three years, some 65,000 women have visited public health facilities to find out about abortions, and 40,000 have undergone the procedure, the Mexico City health secretariat reported this month.

Of that total, 1,200, or three percent of the cases, came from outside the greater Mexico City area from other states.


Nearly half of these, 550, were able to travel to the capital to get a safe, legal abortion over the last year thanks to the support of a group of young women who work in the Fondo de Aborto para la Justicia Social MARÍA (MARÍA Abortion Fund for Social Justice).

MARÍA (the group’s acronym for Women, Abortion, Reproduction, Information and Accompaniment) was founded in May 2009 to provide information, support and financial assistance to women outside greater Mexico City who want an abortion.

“The aim is to get the Federal District law to reach out farther,” Oriana López, director of operations of MARÍA, told IPS.

MARÍA forms part of the National Network of Abortion Funds, an umbrella group for local abortion funds mainly in the United States, and receives financing from Mexican reproductive health groups.

Since December it has also been building a network of individual donors, who now number just over 200, that has helped give the project financial stability. The organisation has even set up a PayPal account for donations.

The aim of the group now is to give some training to the people who accompany the women to get an abortion, who presently provide “basically logistical support.”

“The concept that this is a right is still very weak,” said López. “Women feel it, more than they actually understand it; it’s like there’s a discrepancy between what they believe and what is right, and what they’ve been told.”


According to the Mexico City government, which has been in the hands of the left-wing Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD) since 1997, 83 percent of the abortions that have been carried out were medically induced using abortifacient drugs, 12 percent were performed using vacuum aspiration, and five percent were done by dilation and curettage.

The law legalising abortion in the capital triggered a wave of legal counter-reforms pushed by the most conservative sectors of society in Mexico, led by the local Catholic Church hierarchy and right-wing political leaders, which tightened already strict state legislation against abortion.

As a result, in 18 of Mexico’s 31 states, abortion is now illegal even when the mother’s life is at risk, in cases of rape or incest, or in cases of fetal malformation.

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Mexico’s Supreme Court has upheld a law requiring hospitals to offer rape victims a morning-after birth control pill, rejecting an appeal that argued the pill’s effect constitutes the equivalent of an abortion.

Abortion is regulated under state laws in Mexico, and most of the 31 states outlaw elective abortions. An appeal filed by the Jalisco state government says the federal morning-after law is an intrusion on states’ rights.

But justices disagreed in an 10-1 vote Thursday. The majority ruled that use of the pill is not the equivalent of abortion, but rather is part of a public health policy.

The court said the federal government has the right to set health policy.



Read more: http://www.thenewstribune.com/2010/05/27/1203523/mexico-upholds-morning-after-pill.html?story_link=email_msg#ixzz0pF8aiKte